InnoTech Centre Adapts Google Mobile and PC tracking technology

The new InnoTech centre based in South West College, Cookstown Campus have adapted the Google new technology of mobile and PC tracking. Fifteen IT specialists will be travelling to Europe and the United States to research new innovation and technology in Sustainability, Design, Electronics, Software and ICT. This technology will be used to keep in touch and track the whereabouts of the InnoTech colleagues by both their mobile phones and personal computers.

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The new Google technology recently launched is known as “Google Latitude” which can track people on a computer map via their mobile phones. This service is available free in the UK, US and 24 other countries, but initially only works with certain phones and networks. Mobile phones that are compatible are Android – powered devices, such as the T-Mobile GL, most coloured blackberry devices, most windows mobile s.o & devices and most Symbian s60 devices (Nokia Smartphones). Many Java-enabled (J2ME) mobile phones such as Sony Ericisson devices and IPhone and IPod Touch devices will be compatible in the near future.

It is stated by a Google Spokesman that only the last location will be picked up by the tracking mechanism which will be stored on Google’s computers. It is up to each user to decide who can monitor their location.

For those that are unable to use their mobile phone or do not have a mobile phone but still may want to track their friends and colleagues, Google have widen their software appeal by offering a version that can be installed on their personal computers through their internet Wi-Fi.

Latitude works by using any of the following three kinds of signals — Wi-Fi, 2G/3G/4G mobile or GPS satellite — that a device can pick up to work out its location. By leveraging these wireless capabilities, the software can combine positioning data from satellites, carrier assistance servers and Wi-Fi base stations to significantly speed up positioning, or TTFF (time to first fix).

Try it yourself by logging onto www.google.com/latitude/intro.html